Connecticut

  • July 18, 2024

    Conn. Lawyer Group Wants In On Baby Injury Case

    A group of Connecticut defense lawyers Wednesday told the state supreme court that they should be allowed to address issues in a suit involving a car seat that allegedly injured a child since its decision will affect whether state law holds that companies can be held liable for the absence of a child's relationship with their parents.

  • July 18, 2024

    Conn. Justices Order Redo Of Apartment Tenant's Fee Award

    The Connecticut Supreme Court on Thursday gave a landlord another shot at reducing a $3,500 attorney fee award scored by a tenant in an eviction dispute, holding that the lower court failed to consider whether the total was reasonable under the relevant fee shifting statute.

  • July 18, 2024

    Investor Signs $897K Settlement Over R. Kelly Show Funding

    After security and credit agreements for the promotion of a concert series at the Foxwoods Resort Casino headlined by R&B artist R. Kelly fell apart, an investor has signed a roughly $900,000 deal in a Connecticut state court to recover an out-of-state settlement.

  • July 18, 2024

    Live Nation Previews Part Of Case Against DOJ Suit

    Live Nation and Ticketmaster have teed up part of their fight against an antitrust lawsuit brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and multiple state attorneys general, arguing that the state law claims are "threadbare" and that a chunk of the DOJ case amounts to trying to force them to deal with competitors.

  • July 18, 2024

    FordHarrison Accused Of Terrorizing Conn. Library Workers

    Multistate employment law firm FordHarrison LLP has been dragged into existing feuds between a Connecticut library and two of its employees, with new state court lawsuits accusing the firm of misrepresenting state law and inflicting emotional distress by demanding the employees retract claims allegedly made at a public hearing.

  • July 18, 2024

    Cozen O'Connor Targets Penny Stock Co. CEO For Legal Fees

    Cozen O'Connor is asking a Connecticut state court judge to affirm two Pennsylvania judgments against a penny stock company CEO who lost a federal enforcement action, alleging Bernard Findley and two of his companies owe nearly $750,000 in legal fees.

  • July 18, 2024

    Amphenol Corp. Paying $2.1B For CommScope Mobile Units

    Amphenol Corp. has inked a deal to buy two mobile networks units from CommScope for $2.1 billion, with Latham & Watkins LLP and Alston & Bird LLP advising the companies, respectively, on the all-cash deal, according to statements Thursday.

  • July 17, 2024

    Judge Warns HHS It's Not In 'Reasonable Compliance'

    The Department of Health and Human Services appears not to be in "reasonable compliance" of an injunction ordering it to develop an avenue for Medicare beneficiaries to appeal their hospitalization status, a Connecticut federal judge said in a Tuesday notice.

  • July 17, 2024

    Timken Fired Plant Manager Over DEI Push, Conn. Suit Says

    A former plant manager says in a Connecticut federal lawsuit that a division of Ohio-based roller bearing supplier Timken violated workplace free speech laws by firing him for citing his own multiracial family while discussing with colleagues his beliefs about the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives.

  • July 17, 2024

    Producer Petitions 2nd Circ. To Revive Blacklisting Suit

    A Broadway producer accusing an actor and stage workers union of unlawfully blacklisting him following a labor dispute over a musical has asked the Second Circuit for another chance to revive the claims.

  • July 17, 2024

    Conn. Enacts Legislation To Support Captive Insurers

    Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont signed into law an act aimed at furthering the state's commitment to the captive insurance industry, building upon the legislative efforts of recent years that have positioned Connecticut as the leading domicile for captives.

  • July 17, 2024

    Hospital Trims Its Insulin Pen Claims Against Novo Nordisk

    A Connecticut hospital and Novo Nordisk Inc. have agreed to dismiss several of the pharmaceutical giant's corporate entities from a suit seeking to make the company pay for the hospital's $1 million settlement from an underlying patient class action over allegedly defective insulin pens the firm made.

  • July 17, 2024

    Grayscale Rival's False Ad Suit Won't Move To New Court

    A Connecticut state judge on Wednesday denied Grayscale Investments LLC's request to transfer a competitor's unfair trade practices lawsuit from Bridgeport to the state court system's complex litigation docket, sustaining the plaintiff's objection that said the move would unduly delay a July 2025 trial without a valid reason.

  • July 17, 2024

    ICE Doesn't Have To Reveal Sources, 2nd Circ. Says

    An Ecuadorian man couldn't convince the Second Circuit to toss out a removal order based on a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer's failure to explicitly explain how the agency learned he wasn't a U.S. citizen.

  • July 17, 2024

    Boehringer Wants Inhaler Antitrust Case Moved To Mass.

    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. has urged a Connecticut federal court to transfer a proposed class action accusing it of blocking generic versions of two inhaler medications, saying a similar case was filed in Massachusetts several weeks earlier.

  • July 17, 2024

    Death Threats Not Enough For 2nd Circ. To OK Asylum

    The Second Circuit on Wednesday rejected an asylum application from a Nepali man who claimed to be fleeing political persecution from Maoist partisans, unconvinced that the threats against his life were serious enough.

  • July 16, 2024

    'Excuse Me?': Judge Vexed By Defamation Claim In Ch. 7 Row

    A Connecticut bankruptcy judge on Tuesday appeared skeptical of defamation and tortious interference claims New York-based real estate investor EasyKnock Inc. filed against a trustee handling the Chapter 7 estate of a onetime homeowner, forcing company attorneys to at times to admit they cited no authority to support their case.

  • July 16, 2024

    Unilever Supplier Looks To Drag BP Into Shampoo Class Suit

    A Unilever supplier is trying to shift the blame in a lawsuit accusing it and the consumer goods behemoth of selling carcinogen-tainted dry shampoo, telling a Connecticut federal court that two of its suppliers, including BP, are actually the ones who should be held liable.

  • July 16, 2024

    Accuser Says WWE Paid Doctor To Give Her Mystery Drugs

    Celebrity doctor Carlon Colker gave a former World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. staffer unmarked drugs that made her feel sick and later refused to provide complete and accurate records on her visits there, according to her Tuesday complaint in Connecticut state court seeking information to support her sexual abuse suit against WWE founder Vince McMahon.

  • July 16, 2024

    Connecticut Contractor Fined $1.75M For Tax Evasion

    A Connecticut contractor was ordered to pay a $1.75 million fine for evading federal corporate and individual income taxes from 2006 through 2010, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • July 16, 2024

    Union Fund Trustees Say Elevance Usurped Fiduciary Power

    The trustees of two union health plans said Elevance Health Inc. and its subsidiaries violated federal benefits law when they overpaid themselves for administrative services and medical providers for patient care, arguing the insurer had significant control over the management of the plans and their assets.

  • July 16, 2024

    Cohen Asks Justices To Hear Claim Trump Put Him In Prison

    Donald Trump's former attorney-turned-critic Michael Cohen has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take another look at his suit claiming the former president had him imprisoned in retaliation for his plans to portray Trump negatively in his book.

  • July 16, 2024

    Conn. Nonprofit Skirts Sanctions Over Skipped Depositions

    A month after three officers of a Connecticut nonprofit failed to sit for postverdict depositions in a $13.8 million wrongful death case because their attorney was on vacation in Europe, the organization dodged sanctions Tuesday in state court when a judge ordered them to submit to the questioning within 30 days.

  • July 16, 2024

    Chinese Exile Guo Guilty On Most Counts In $1B Fraud Case

    A Manhattan federal jury on Tuesday convicted prominent Chinese Communist Party critic Miles Guo on most charges alleging he operated a vast fraud that solicited more than $1 billion worth of sham investments from his supporters.

  • July 16, 2024

    The 2024 Diversity Snapshot: What You Need To Know

    Law firms' ongoing initiatives to address diversity challenges have driven another year of progress, with the representation of minority attorneys continuing to improve across the board, albeit at a slower pace than in previous years. Here's our data dive into minority representation at law firms in 2023.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Now More Than Ever, Lawyers Must Exhibit Professionalism

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    As society becomes increasingly fractured and workplace incivility is on the rise, attorneys must champion professionalism and lead by example, demonstrating how lawyers can respectfully disagree without being disagreeable, says Edward Casmere at Norton Rose.

  • Series

    Serving In The National Guard Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My ongoing military experience as a judge advocate general in the National Guard has shaped me as a person and a lawyer, teaching me the importance of embracing confidence, balance and teamwork in both my Army and civilian roles, says Danielle Aymond at Baker Donelson.

  • A Midyear Forecast: Tailwinds Expected For Atty Hourly Rates

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    Hourly rates for partners, associates and support staff continued to rise in the first half of this year, and this growth shows no signs of slowing for the rest of 2024 and into next year, driven in part by the return of mergers and acquisitions and the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence, says Chuck Chandler at Valeo Partners.

  • 7th Circ Joins Trend Of No CGL Coverage For Structural Flaws

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    The Seventh Circuit, which recently held potential structural instability did not count as property damage under a construction company's commercial general liability policy, joins a growing consensus that faulty work does not implicate coverage without tangible and present damage to the project, say Sarah Abrams at Baleen Specialty, and Elan Kandel and James Talbert at Bailey Cavalieri.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Why High Court Social Media Ruling Will Be Hotly Debated

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    In deciding the NetChoice cases that challenged Florida and Texas content moderation laws, what the U.S. Supreme Court justices said about social media platforms — and the First Amendment — will have implications and raise questions for nearly all online operators, say Jacob Canter and Joanna Rosen Forster at Crowell & Moring.

  • In Memoriam: The Modern Administrative State

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    On June 28, the modern administrative state, where courts deferred to agency interpretations of ambiguous statutes, died when the U.S. Supreme Court overruled its previous decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council — but it is survived by many cases decided under the Chevron framework, say Joseph Schaeffer and Jessica Deyoe at Babst Calland.

  • How To Clean Up Your Generative AI-Produced Legal Drafts

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    As law firms increasingly rely on generative artificial intelligence tools to produce legal text, attorneys should be on guard for the overuse of cohesive devices in initial drafts, and consider a few editing pointers to clean up AI’s repetitive and choppy outputs, says Ivy Grey at WordRake.

  • 2nd Circ. ERISA Ruling May Help Fight Unfair Arb. Clauses

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    The Second Circuit recently held that a plaintiff seeking planwide relief under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act cannot be compelled to individual arbitration, a decision that opens the door to new applications of the effective vindication doctrine to defeat onerous and one-sided arbitration clauses, say Raphael Janove and Liana Vitale at Janove.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Various Paths For Labor And Employment Law

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    Labor and employment law leans heavily on federal agency guidance, so the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to toss out Chevron deference will ripple through this area, with future workplace policies possibly taking shape through strategic litigation, informal guidance, state-level regulation and more, says Alexander MacDonald at Littler.

  • Series

    Boxing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Boxing has influenced my legal work by enabling me to confidently hone the skills I've learned from the sport, like the ability to remain calm under pressure, evaluate an opponent's weaknesses and recognize when to seize an important opportunity, says Kirsten Soto at Clyde & Co.

  • Opinion

    Industry Self-Regulation Will Shine Post-Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper decision will shape the contours of industry self-regulation in the years to come, providing opportunities for this often-misunderstood practice, says Eric Reicin at BBB National Programs.

  • 3 Ways Agencies Will Keep Making Law After Chevron

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    The U.S. Supreme Court clearly thinks it has done something big in overturning the Chevron precedent that had given deference to agencies' statutory interpretations, but regulated parties have to consider how agencies retain significant power to shape the law and its meaning, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

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